Category: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Photos: Summer TCA Press Tour

Photos: Summer TCA Press Tour

Rachel attended the Summer TCA Press Tour yesterday to promote The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. Photos from the event as well as an accompanying photoshoot have been added to the photo gallery.

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Press: Rachel Brosnahan (‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’) Emmy episode revealed for Best Comedy Actress

Press: Rachel Brosnahan (‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’) Emmy episode revealed for Best Comedy Actress

Gold Derby can exclusively reveal that Rachel Brosnahan is entering “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” episode “Thank You and Good Night” as her Emmy submission for Best Comedy Actress. This installment streamed November 29 and was the eighth and final episode of the first season for the Amazon show.

In this segment, Midge (Brosnahan) and Susie (Alex Borstein) drink away their troubles after Midge’s tirade on stage against comic Sophie Lennon (Jane Lynch). While hungover the following day, Susie reads the bad headlines to her over the phone. Midge gets ready for her son’s birthday party while her parents are fighting. Her ex-husband wants to reunite and move to California.

It’s the first nomination in this category for Brosnahan after a previous bid as Best Drama Guest Actress in “House of Cards” (2015). For the 2018 ceremony, she is up against previous champions Pamela Adlon (“Better Things”), Allison Janney (“Mom”) and Lily Tomlin (“Grace and Frankie”), past nominee Tracee Ellis Ross (“Black-ish”) and first-timer Issa Rae (“Insecure”).

Source: Gold Derby

Press: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’: Old Guard Helps Amazon Newbie Score 14 Nominations

Press: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’: Old Guard Helps Amazon Newbie Score 14 Nominations

Fresh off its lauded first season, Best Comedy Series nominee “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” yielded a record 14 Emmy nominations, the most ever for any Amazon Prime series. Created by Amy Sherman-Palladino (“Gilmore Girls”), this portrait of a well-heeled 1950s New York Jewish wife and mother (“House of Cards” Emmy nominee Rachel Brosnahan) who pursues stand-up comedy following the breakup of her marriage, already took home two Comedy Golden Globes (Best Television Series and Actress). Brosnahan also won Best Actress in a TV Comedy Series Critics Choice award.

While dramatic actress Brosnahan is a relative newcomer who surprisingly landed the plum comedy role after auditioning for Amy and Dan Sherman-Palladino, three popular Emmy veterans returned to the awards fray. Supporting Actor nominee Tony Shalhoub hasn’t scored an Emmy nod since his heyday as the star of “Monk” –he won three Emmys and a Golden Globe for his OCD detective. He adds his 9th Emmy nomination for his sensitive performance as Maisel’s beleaguered father to his recent Tony award for “The Band’s Visit.”

“Family Guy” voice-over performer Alex Borstein earned her third Emmy nomination, as Supporting Actress, but her first in front of the camera as Maisel’s tough but loyal manager, while Emmy perennial Jane Lynch scored her 10th Emmy nomination, as Guest Supporting Actress for her old-school comedienne.

“Roseanne” writing Emmy nominee Amy Sherman-Palladino landed nominations for writing and directing the “Mrs. Maisel” pilot. Calling from the Season Two set, the Sherman-Palladinos reminded that while popular, “Gilmore Girls” was always Emmy-overlooked except for hair and makeup. “I still want to get Lauren Graham an Emmy,” said Amy. “My career has been about when I blather to the correct person at the right time who is open to something new interesting and then we’re off to the races.”

The Sherman-Palladinos are proud of Brosnahan for carrying the series. “Lucile Ball played femme fatales and very beautiful women, she never did comedy until ‘I Love Lucy.’” said Dan. “Then suddenly she was a comedienne. We got to do that with Rachel. Her roles were more being tied up, thrown in a ditch and killed. I’m not saying we are not going to do that with her!”

Other nominations include many craft categories: production design for a narrative period or fantasy program, casting for a comedy series, cinematography for a single-camera series, period costumes, single-camera picture editing, hairstyling for a single-camera series, and musical supervision.

Season One of “Mrs. Maisel” consisted of eight episodes, and Seasons two and three are expected to be 10 episodes. The show will return to Amazon for its sophomore season later this year.

Source: IndieWire

Photos: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Season 1 Additions

Photos: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Season 1 Additions

I updated the gallery with additional photos from season 1 of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.

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Press: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ is proof that the funny woman has arrived!

Press: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ is proof that the funny woman has arrived!

Welcome to ‘The Marvelous Mrs Maisel’ hangover club if you have these same symptoms — feeling of restlessness until the show’s return, an inexplicable sense of anticipation over how the beloved Midge Maisel’s life would pan out, and a craving to get tickled over and over again by her on-stage banter — something that she unapologetically borrows from her personal experiences.

Hatched from the brains of Amy Sherman-Palladino and Dan Palladino (the husband-and-wife pair behind the long-running ‘Gilmore Girls’), back in November, Amazon brought to us a refreshing comedy starring Rachel Brosnahan in the lead role. As the vivacious, spirited, and young Mrs. Maisel, the actress instantly grabbed eyeballs and even turned the 1958 setting appear as realistic as possible. Of course, it wasn’t entirely Brosnahan’s doing and a better portion of the credit goes to Mrs. Masiel’s creator as well — regardless, the show found a place in the hearts of its millennial viewers.

So much so, that in the following months, Brosnahan went on to prove that just like her character, she too has a range of hidden talents, beginning with her penchant for comedy. The 27-year-old American actress was later bestowed with a Golden Globe as an acknowledgment of her comic flair — another addition to her numerous skills as previously seen on prestige shows like ‘House of Cards’ and ‘Manhattan’.

The backstory is simple. Brosnahan’s stint as ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ is impressive. And it’s because the show has a depressingly brilliant charm about it. Set in the late 50s-early 60s New York, the period comedy takes a microscopic look at the women of the era through the eyes of the lead character. Inadvertently, while going through a rough patch in her marriage, our wonderful Mrs. Maisel happens to stumble upon her skills as a stand-up comic.

Had it not been for a night of reckless drinking and wallowing, perhaps the desperate housewife would have never been able to escape the reality of her marriage, which is pretty much on the brink of getting over by the end of the first season. Throughout the first half of the plot, in fact, Miriam (the erstwhile Mrs. Maisel) is driven by one solo need — earn her own living and to that end comedy, surprisingly, comes as a handy tool. But comedy as a performance art is a man’s game and for a Jewish woman, living in a post World War II times, there is not much on offer.

And yet, the ‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ gathers her guts, takes to the stage and her seemingly mindless ramblings end up appealing to the crowd at The Gaslight Cafe. There is something about her self-depreciating rants — a mix of humility and humiliation — that strikes a chord with the audience both in reel and real life. Once on stage, though, Miriam mostly talks about her Mrs. Maisel days.

Just like any talented stand-up, Mrs Maisel boils down her own life issues and troubles into a concentrated form so universal that everyone relates to it.

A lot goes on behind the closed doors of a living room (or kitchen, as some may prefer), that comprise the day to day life of a homemaker, or a mother, or a wife. And the brand of humor that is used in ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ is practically an ode to all of this, the banter and the usual tete a tete. But what comes as a pleasant surprise to the Miriam-Susie duo is when their stories resonate with the drunk crowd of the dimly-light clubs.

Stand-up for women is a difficult course, to say the least. This is especially true because the act, in its very nature, is contradicting to the ways of feminity and related traditions —everything that Mrs. Maisel’s journey portrays in all its glory. Incidentally, the show’s success — with fans as well as critics — points towards a harsh reality, that this theorem is relevant to the world outside of Mrs. Maisel’s as well.

There is no dearth of funny men in the entertainment industry but the same can’t be said for their female counterparts. Not only are shows with a central, humorous character scarce – or lame like ‘Two Broke Girls’ and an occasional brilliance in the form of a Lorelai Gilmore — but also the existent female stand-up comedy artists (fictional or otherwise) rounds up to a handful.

It is because of these reasons that the struggles and desperations of Mrs. Maisel, in her 50s set world, is still very relevant today, in 2018. Like Amy Schumer would have said that the very act of being a comedian and a woman at the same time is a strong feminist stance since it suggests a “woman’s comedic voice is as valuable as a man’s”.

So, it’s no surprise that Mrs. Maisel’s story resonated with the viewers. And the truth is, it has a lot to do with Sherman-Palladino’s ease of story-telling. Instead of piling the plot with serious and intense outbursts, the daughter of stand-up comedian Don Sherman chooses humor in her work — drawing inspiration from her formative years, having grown up in Southern California with stories of comedians being a regular topic at the dinner table — to deliver even the saddest moments of the leading lady’s journey with a chuckle.

Humor, unsurprisingly, turns out to be a weapon in the hands of this showrunner-actor duo Sherman-Palladino and Brosnahan. Both women. And someone, who had the foresight to predict the growing appetite for comedies centered around characters like Mrs. Maisel, the essentially funny woman.

Source: MEAWW

Photos: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Season 2 On the Set

Photos: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Season 2 On the Set

I added 14 additional photos of Rachel filming a scene for season 2 of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel to the gallery.

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Photos: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Season 2 – On the Set

Photos: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Season 2 – On the Set

I added photos of Rachel filming a scene for season 2 of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel to the gallery.

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Press: ‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Star Rachel Brosnahan Talks Season 2 Pressure And Excitement

Press: ‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Star Rachel Brosnahan Talks Season 2 Pressure And Excitement

“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” star Rachel Brosnahan has had a whirlwind year. The 1950s-set dramedy premiered to rave reviews in November. She earned a Golden Globe in January, and she is already in the middle of filming Season 2 while Amazon Prime’s Emmy campaign is in full force. The actress told International Business Times that there are upsides and downsides to being a runaway success.

“As somebody who has never done comedy and was horrified every single second of shooting this first season, [the Golden Globe for best actress in a comedy] certainly is a nice little confidence boost,” she told IBT at a PaleyLive event for “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” in New York earlier this month.

“It also adds a fair amount of pressure,” she continued. “We want to be able to keep the second season at the level that the first was and then some and challenge ourselves further.”

There are plenty of challenges that Brosnahan is excited to tackle. Details about “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” Season 2, which will continue to be run by “Gilmore Girls” masterminds Amy Sherman-Palladino and Dan Palladino, are being kept under wraps, but filming kicked off in France earlier this year, something the leading lady was very happy about. Brosnahan also revealed that she is also looking forward to Midge balancing her new life as a comic with her other roles.

“Well, we went to Paris — that was exciting. And I’m really excited to explore the ways in which Midge’s three different worlds collide,” the actress said. “She’s a budding standup comedian, a newly working woman and a housewife, question mark? Mother, daughter and those worlds don’t belong in the same story. And I’m excited to see how she’s forced to manage them in Season 2.”

The Golden Globe winner (and likely soon-to-be Emmy nominee) added that Midge’s relationship with her children will continue to be explored throughout the series, even though Midge doesn’t seem like the world’s best mother.

“Midge had children because she wanted to, but she wanted those things because that was the only option ever presented to her,” the actress explained. “She wanted to be exactly like her mother, and she did it and then realizes that other options do exist. That there could perhaps be another path for her, and maybe the motherhood gene is not deeply embedded in her body.”

Fans will find out more when “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” Season 2 premieres on Amazon Prime. A release date has yet to be revealed.

Source: International Business Times

Photos: PaleyFest & Magazine Scans

Photos: PaleyFest & Magazine Scans

I added scans from the May issue of Good Housekeeping & Issue #23 of Darling to the gallery. I also added new photos of Rachel at PaleyFest. Check out the links below.

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Press: Rachel Brosnahan on Why ‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Is ‘Still Very Relevant Today’


Rachel recently sat down with Variety to discuss her show The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. Read the article below.

Like the character she plays on Amazon’s “Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” Rachel Brosnahan has proved herself to have hidden talents. Previously known for her dramatic work on series like “House of Cards” and “Manhattan,” Brosnahan is showing off a deft gift for comedy as the ’50s-era housewife-turned-standup. That’s what earned her a Golden Globe trophy as best actress in a comedy for the first season (as well as a series prize), and made her a frontrunner in the Emmy race.

During a break in production on season two, she talks with Variety about why a period piece is relevant today, being told she “wasn’t funny” — and the surprising injury she sustained on set.

For a show that’s set in the 50s, it feels so relevant now. What is it about that showrunners Amy Sherman-Palladino and Dan Palladino are doing that makes the show feel so timely?

I think that the scenes surrounding some of the battles that women faced then are still very relevant today. And then women being considered secondary citizens or this idea of women not being funny or having to fit a certain mold and apologize for their ambitions. Those are all things that women still face today and I think that those ideas have never not been relevant and Amy and Dan have managed to bring them to life with a fresh eye. But also, the story at its core is about a woman finding the voice that she didn’t know she had. And that’s also something that’s happening all over the country and all over the world, right now.

I was just reading an interview where you were saying that you were once told that you weren’t funny. 

This is gonna be the thing that ends up on my tombstone, “Was once told, not funny.”

Thank you, Internet.

I don’t know how to say this in a way that totally makes sense, but it became something that was just understood. When you’re really young and you’re figuring out who you are and what your strengths are, the feedback that was given regarding my auditions, enough times, was kind of “She’s just not funny. Not really for sitcoms.” And so I guess I mostly stopped going into that stuff and focused on other strengths. And so when the show came across my desk, I was very nervous about the idea of even approaching comedy. Because I felt like that was something that I’d internalized, but not in a negative way. But now I’m kicking myself for limiting myself in that way earlier. Because this has been such a fulfilling, learning process and an important one.

I do think it took someone visionary to look at you and your body of work and be like, “Yes, she’s perfect for this and yes, she can do this.” Do you feel that?

I don’t know what they were thinking. But, yes, it was a leap for sure and one that I’m eternally grateful that all the powers involved took.

Are there things you didn’t get to do in the first season that you want to do in the second?

Something I’m looking forward to exploring more in the second season is the tension between Midge’s three very distinct and different worlds. She’s a mother and a daughter and a, possibly, wife/ex-wife, as it left off in the first season. She’s a working woman now. She has a job that she loves and she’s also a budding stand-up and none of those worlds really gel together. Though I’m looking forward to watching her try to balance and I think that the more invested she becomes in each of the three, particularly the work and the stand-up, the harder that juggling will become. I’m looking forward to seeing how that unfolds.

What have you learned from the experience of making the first season?

I feel like I learned to be braver in the first season than maybe I’ve ever felt. Midge is an extremely empowered and confident and pretty fearless woman and finding that on a daily basis is not always easy. And I feel like, hopefully, I’ve absorbed some of those things myself, moving into season two. There’s both less and more pressure going into season two, right? We know what it is, we’re so grateful that people responded to the show but also now we want to make sure that this season’s even better than the last one.

Do you feel that pressure?

A little bit, but it’s motivating. It’s a nice kind of pressure. The pressure that only comes from feeling that people responded to the art that we’re putting out into the world. And though we don’t want to let them down, but we also don’t wanna let ourselves down and I feel good about what we’ve done so far and we’re excited to keep pushing those boundaries.

Now that the showrunners have seen what you can do, is more coming?

I’m sure it’s going to get more challenging in ways that I couldn’t possibly imagine, in some of the weirdest ways. I’ve already sustained an injury from an unexpected stunt.

What happened?

Well, I can’t say much without giving everything away but it involved a rolling chair and some choreography. Took a little tumble, so I’m learning new skills. Again without giving anything away, we finished last season and I got this text from Amy going “Can you ride a bike?” And heard that [co-star] Marin [Hinkle] got a text from Amy going, “Can you speak French?” So they’re definitely going to keep challenging us in season two. I’m thinking they just like to watch us suffer a little bit.

You just mentioned you were just at a costume fitting. How much does that inform the show? Does that help you get into character?

Enormously. But the ability to transform so completely with costumes and hair and makeup makes my job easier. There’s less pretending involved. I can look in the mirror and see someone very different from myself and those are my favorite kind of characters, the ones that feel furthest from me. Midge’s outward appearance is very important to her and I think that it’s something the attention paid to her appearance and the way she is presenting herself to the world is part of what makes her feel empowered. So the costumes are huge and Donna Zakowska, our costume designer, is absolutely brilliant and her attention to detail continues to astound me. The creations and the places that she looks for inspiration, I’m blown away every time I step foot in the new fittings.

The awards consideration, the fact that you’re getting all this buzz, what does all that mean to you?

It’s such a lovely feeling to know that everybody’s hard work and literal blood, sweat and tears has been recognized. The awards stuff is great but actually feels less important than the fact that it feels like the show has touched such a wide variety of people. That’s what makes us feel the best. And awards stuff is great because it means that, hopefully, we get to keep going. That we get to have a job for a little bit longer and a job we love, at that. And it’s obviously an honor but the coolest part has been to hear from young women, especially, but also older men who couldn’t say that they were essentially coerced into watching the show by their wives or daughters and have fallen in love with it, as well. It’s nice to know that people love it as much as we do. That feels like the greatest reward.

Are you recognized more because of this role?

In New York, that’s not as much of a thing as it is in say, Los Angeles, so if people are recognizing me, I may not always know it. But I also look very different in my real life when I’m walking the dog up in Harlem, you know? So it’s not been something that feels like an enormous shift. The question I keep getting asked is, “How has your life changed?” And it feels like that’s a funny question because at the core, I feel like it hasn’t. But strangers can say my last name now, which has been very exciting. That’s never happened to me before.

Is there a moment you’re proudest of when you look back over the first season?

There’s a set in episode seven. It’s been fondly referred to as the epic take-down of Sophie Lennon and that set, in discussions with Amy and Dan was kind of being talked about as a place where Midge really comes into her own as a comedian. Really is able to combine her impulsiveness and her stream of consciousness style with a more polished understanding of what it means to, say, interact with an audience or to have certain pieces prepared and then she naturally goes off the rails. But i was the first time where I noticed I felt more comfortable stepping onto the stage and I was able to kind of clock how much I had learned about the more technical side of doing this form of comedy. I remember looking out at the audience and feeling, so distinctly, like we were in it together and it was the first time I really went into one feeling like it was gonna be okay. It was a place where I really felt that parallel journey between Midge and myself. And it was a very cool moment.

Is there one moment where you feel like you really owned this, that the part really became you?

No. But I think if I ever really reach that point, I’m not working hard enough.

Source: Variety

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