Category: Press

Photos: Off Camera Cover & Photoshoot

Photos: Off Camera Cover & Photoshoot

Photos of Rachel from issue 150 of Off Camera have been added to the gallery. You can purchase a full copy of the digital magazine here and you can pre-order Rachel’s full episode of Off Camera with Sam Jones here.

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Press: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ is proof that the funny woman has arrived!

Press: ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ is proof that the funny woman has arrived!

Welcome to ‘The Marvelous Mrs Maisel’ hangover club if you have these same symptoms — feeling of restlessness until the show’s return, an inexplicable sense of anticipation over how the beloved Midge Maisel’s life would pan out, and a craving to get tickled over and over again by her on-stage banter — something that she unapologetically borrows from her personal experiences.

Hatched from the brains of Amy Sherman-Palladino and Dan Palladino (the husband-and-wife pair behind the long-running ‘Gilmore Girls’), back in November, Amazon brought to us a refreshing comedy starring Rachel Brosnahan in the lead role. As the vivacious, spirited, and young Mrs. Maisel, the actress instantly grabbed eyeballs and even turned the 1958 setting appear as realistic as possible. Of course, it wasn’t entirely Brosnahan’s doing and a better portion of the credit goes to Mrs. Masiel’s creator as well — regardless, the show found a place in the hearts of its millennial viewers.

So much so, that in the following months, Brosnahan went on to prove that just like her character, she too has a range of hidden talents, beginning with her penchant for comedy. The 27-year-old American actress was later bestowed with a Golden Globe as an acknowledgment of her comic flair — another addition to her numerous skills as previously seen on prestige shows like ‘House of Cards’ and ‘Manhattan’.

The backstory is simple. Brosnahan’s stint as ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ is impressive. And it’s because the show has a depressingly brilliant charm about it. Set in the late 50s-early 60s New York, the period comedy takes a microscopic look at the women of the era through the eyes of the lead character. Inadvertently, while going through a rough patch in her marriage, our wonderful Mrs. Maisel happens to stumble upon her skills as a stand-up comic.

Had it not been for a night of reckless drinking and wallowing, perhaps the desperate housewife would have never been able to escape the reality of her marriage, which is pretty much on the brink of getting over by the end of the first season. Throughout the first half of the plot, in fact, Miriam (the erstwhile Mrs. Maisel) is driven by one solo need — earn her own living and to that end comedy, surprisingly, comes as a handy tool. But comedy as a performance art is a man’s game and for a Jewish woman, living in a post World War II times, there is not much on offer.

And yet, the ‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ gathers her guts, takes to the stage and her seemingly mindless ramblings end up appealing to the crowd at The Gaslight Cafe. There is something about her self-depreciating rants — a mix of humility and humiliation — that strikes a chord with the audience both in reel and real life. Once on stage, though, Miriam mostly talks about her Mrs. Maisel days.

Just like any talented stand-up, Mrs Maisel boils down her own life issues and troubles into a concentrated form so universal that everyone relates to it.

A lot goes on behind the closed doors of a living room (or kitchen, as some may prefer), that comprise the day to day life of a homemaker, or a mother, or a wife. And the brand of humor that is used in ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ is practically an ode to all of this, the banter and the usual tete a tete. But what comes as a pleasant surprise to the Miriam-Susie duo is when their stories resonate with the drunk crowd of the dimly-light clubs.

Stand-up for women is a difficult course, to say the least. This is especially true because the act, in its very nature, is contradicting to the ways of feminity and related traditions —everything that Mrs. Maisel’s journey portrays in all its glory. Incidentally, the show’s success — with fans as well as critics — points towards a harsh reality, that this theorem is relevant to the world outside of Mrs. Maisel’s as well.

There is no dearth of funny men in the entertainment industry but the same can’t be said for their female counterparts. Not only are shows with a central, humorous character scarce – or lame like ‘Two Broke Girls’ and an occasional brilliance in the form of a Lorelai Gilmore — but also the existent female stand-up comedy artists (fictional or otherwise) rounds up to a handful.

It is because of these reasons that the struggles and desperations of Mrs. Maisel, in her 50s set world, is still very relevant today, in 2018. Like Amy Schumer would have said that the very act of being a comedian and a woman at the same time is a strong feminist stance since it suggests a “woman’s comedic voice is as valuable as a man’s”.

So, it’s no surprise that Mrs. Maisel’s story resonated with the viewers. And the truth is, it has a lot to do with Sherman-Palladino’s ease of story-telling. Instead of piling the plot with serious and intense outbursts, the daughter of stand-up comedian Don Sherman chooses humor in her work — drawing inspiration from her formative years, having grown up in Southern California with stories of comedians being a regular topic at the dinner table — to deliver even the saddest moments of the leading lady’s journey with a chuckle.

Humor, unsurprisingly, turns out to be a weapon in the hands of this showrunner-actor duo Sherman-Palladino and Brosnahan. Both women. And someone, who had the foresight to predict the growing appetite for comedies centered around characters like Mrs. Maisel, the essentially funny woman.

Source: MEAWW

Photos: Backstage Magazine (December 2017) Scans

Photos: Backstage Magazine (December 2017) Scans

Additional scans from Rachel’s December 14, 2017 cover issue of Backstage Magazine have been added to the gallery. Thank you so much to Girl Jay for the additions.

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Press: ‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Star Rachel Brosnahan Talks Season 2 Pressure And Excitement

Press: ‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Star Rachel Brosnahan Talks Season 2 Pressure And Excitement

“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” star Rachel Brosnahan has had a whirlwind year. The 1950s-set dramedy premiered to rave reviews in November. She earned a Golden Globe in January, and she is already in the middle of filming Season 2 while Amazon Prime’s Emmy campaign is in full force. The actress told International Business Times that there are upsides and downsides to being a runaway success.

“As somebody who has never done comedy and was horrified every single second of shooting this first season, [the Golden Globe for best actress in a comedy] certainly is a nice little confidence boost,” she told IBT at a PaleyLive event for “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” in New York earlier this month.

“It also adds a fair amount of pressure,” she continued. “We want to be able to keep the second season at the level that the first was and then some and challenge ourselves further.”

There are plenty of challenges that Brosnahan is excited to tackle. Details about “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” Season 2, which will continue to be run by “Gilmore Girls” masterminds Amy Sherman-Palladino and Dan Palladino, are being kept under wraps, but filming kicked off in France earlier this year, something the leading lady was very happy about. Brosnahan also revealed that she is also looking forward to Midge balancing her new life as a comic with her other roles.

“Well, we went to Paris — that was exciting. And I’m really excited to explore the ways in which Midge’s three different worlds collide,” the actress said. “She’s a budding standup comedian, a newly working woman and a housewife, question mark? Mother, daughter and those worlds don’t belong in the same story. And I’m excited to see how she’s forced to manage them in Season 2.”

The Golden Globe winner (and likely soon-to-be Emmy nominee) added that Midge’s relationship with her children will continue to be explored throughout the series, even though Midge doesn’t seem like the world’s best mother.

“Midge had children because she wanted to, but she wanted those things because that was the only option ever presented to her,” the actress explained. “She wanted to be exactly like her mother, and she did it and then realizes that other options do exist. That there could perhaps be another path for her, and maybe the motherhood gene is not deeply embedded in her body.”

Fans will find out more when “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” Season 2 premieres on Amazon Prime. A release date has yet to be revealed.

Source: International Business Times

Press: Amazon wants big addictive female shows women can’t stop talking about

Press: Amazon wants big addictive female shows women can’t stop talking about

Amazon Studios head Jennifer Salke dished about her plans for new programming geared toward women that sounds really exciting.

It’s an exciting time for Amazon, especially for Prime members who are anxiously awaiting the next wave of great Amazon Originals that will be coming out over the next little while.

Tasked with that responsibility is Jennifer Salke, who took over as the studio head for the disgraced Roy Price who was ousted over sexual harassment. Salke is not wasting any time putting her mark on the company, renewing Golden Globes winner The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Bosch and Jack Ryan, even ahead of the Aug. 31 premiere.

She’s also had to oversee the exit of Jeffrey Tambor from Transparent amid harassment accusations and is locking up stars like Jordan Peele to overall TV deals.

Oh, and don’t forget about the billion dollar project making The Lord of the Rings into a TV series. While that’s a big deal, financially and creatively, that show won’t be in production until 2020 and released until 2021.

However, there are plenty of worthwhile ideas in Salke’s mind that she wants to get Prime Video subscribers excited about. Particularly, the female audience, according to her comments in a wide-ranging interview conducted with The Hollywood Reporter’s Lesley Goldberg.

“We are going to have lots of big shows. They’re not all going to be genre sci-fi. We’re also going to have some big addictive female shows. We’re looking for our next big show that women also can’t stop talking about.”

I think this is awesome and think it’s a direct result of the success of Mrs. Maisel that took home the Golden Globe for Best Comedy and saw Rachel Brosnahan take home the Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Comedy.

Amy Sherman-Palladino made that show about a housewife who has her life turned upside down after her husband leaves her and suddenly she finds herself on the stage as a stand-up comedian, and a hilarious one at that!

This may be the new flagship show for Prime Video as a result and with Transparent ending, The Man in the High Castle off the air for so long that people are forgetting all about it, this type of programming could soon be the norm for Amazon.

Certainly, a variety of programming will be ideal, but catering to the female demographic is a smart play for a myriad of reasons, and I can’t wait to see what type of shows the creatives will think of.

Brosnahan is already having another series developed for her, which sounds totally exciting, and means she’ll be awfully busy while also working on Mrs. Maisel. If the next show can have half the amount of success as this, it should be another smash hit for Amazon.

Source: Amazon Advisor

Photos/Press: The Hollywood Reporter June 6th Scans

Photos/Press: The Hollywood Reporter June 6th Scans

I added scans from the June 6th issue of The Hollywood Reporter to the gallery. Enjoy!

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Press/Videos: Additional ‘Off Camera with Sam Jones’ Clips

Press/Videos: Additional ‘Off Camera with Sam Jones’ Clips

Off Camera with Sam Jones has released two additional video clips from his interview with Rachel. Check them out below, and check out the full interview June 11, 2018 at 9PM ET/PT on the Audience Network, Directv.

Press/Videos: Rachel to Appear on ‘Off Camera with Sam Jones’

Press/Videos: Rachel to Appear on ‘Off Camera with Sam Jones’

Rachel will be on Off Camera with Sam Jones on June 11, 2018 at 9PM ET/PT on the Audience Network, Directv. You can watch a short clip below.

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Press: “It’s So Hard to Be Right”: The Comedy Actress Roundtable

Press: “It’s So Hard to Be Right”: The Comedy Actress Roundtable

The Hollywood Reporter has added an interview from the Comedy Actress Roundtable as well as the interview segments of the rest of the Roundtable actors. Check out the interview & links to the segments below.

Seven of TV’s top funny ladies — Drew Barrymore, Rachel Brosnahan, Alison Brie, Tracee Ellis Ross, Debra Messing, Molly Shannon and Frankie Shaw — open up about pushing boundaries, demanding fair pay and the long, hard battle to keep their clothes on: “It wasn’t until we started having these conversations that I realized I’d been sexually harassed.”

These days, there is a palpable camaraderie when you bring together Hollywood’s highest-profile actresses. At least a few of those who gathered for The Hollywood Reporter’s annual Television Comedy Actress Roundtable have spent recent months in war rooms and on email chains mapping out a plan to change the gender politics that have contributed to a culture of #MeToo accusations and glaring pay inequality. The passion that has fueled the Time’s Up movement was on display during this mid-April conversation, which touched on everything from nudity demands to a yanked episode of Black-ish. Over the course of an hour, the septet — Drew Barrymore, 43 (Netflix’s Santa Clarita Diet); Alison Brie, 35 (Netflix’s GLOW); Rachel Brosnahan, 27 (Amazon’s The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel); Debra Messing, 49 (NBC’s Will & Grace); Tracee Ellis Ross, 45 (ABC’s Black-ish); Molly Shannon, 53 (HBO’s Divorce); and Frankie Shaw, 36 (Showtime’s SMILF) — got deeply personal, with at least a few tales prompting spontaneous table-banging and plenty of applause.

Let’s start broad: What’s the most amusing or frustrating feedback you’ve received when trying out for a part?

TRACEE ELLIS ROSS I had a casting director say I need to work on my girls, as they [her breasts] were referred to, because they were too low, which is where God put them, so I think they’re in a really good spot. (Laughs.) But she called down the hall for one of her assistants to bring another bra …

ALISON BRIE During an audition?

ROSS
Yes, ma’am.

DREW BARRYMORE Oh no.

ROSS Yes, ma’am. (Laughter.) She was like, “Does anyone have on a 34B?” They come down, and it was a 32 something or other, and I was like, “That’s not gonna fit.” She was like, “They’ll spill out, it’ll be great.”

FRANKIE SHAW One time I was in an audition for House of Lies, and the casting director said I needed to show more skin. She actually took the shirt off her back and gave me her tank top. I still didn’t get the part.

MOLLY SHANNON I remember going to an audition when I was first starting out, and I bumped into another girl auditioning who, right before I went in, was like, “Oh, my God, have you gained, like, a hundred pounds?”

RACHEL BROSNAHAN No!

BARRYMORE That happened to me recently. I’d gained a bunch of weight, and I was in a restaurant, and a woman goes, “God, you have so many kids.” And I was like, “Well, two.” And she goes, “And obviously one on the way.” I looked at her and, for the first time in my life, I go, “No, I’m just fucking fat.” (Everyone claps.)

There’s been lots of discussion lately about whether we can and should be able to separate art from the artist. Where do you stand?

SHAW It depends on how harmful they are.

ROSS And what the harm is.

This has come up in the context of Roseanne Barr and her controversial social media presence, which prompted some to boycott her sitcom [before it was canceled by ABC a month and a half after this interview].

DEBRA MESSING In a perfect world, we take on a different character, one that’s separate from ourselves. The thing that has made Roseanne and Roseanne Barr so …

ROSS Compelling?

MESSING Divisive.

ROSS Better word.

MESSING … is that, in its day, it was one of the greatest shows ever, and it really pushed the boundaries, but she made it clear from the beginning that this was her — she said, “I’m just being me.” That’s very different from saying, “I’m creating a character.” And then when you have someone who is very outspoken on social media and who says things like “Heil Hitler” or that gay people are pedophiles or …

BROSNAHAN Oh God.

MESSING So, it’s not about having a conversation about health care or about defense of the country, it’s about humanity, racism, sexism.

SHAW
And essentially normalizing white supremacy.

BROSNAHAN There’s a difference between being tolerant and tolerating intolerance, and there is no need to tolerate intolerance. So, can we separate an artist from their art? Yes, we do all the time. We have forever. Should we? I think we need to re-evaluate.

ROSS
And we’re in different times because of what’s happening in the White House. Things that were not tolerated or not acceptable have been lost, and I think there is a recalibration that needs to occur. It’s the reason it feels so frightening right now.

SHAW What’s the answer? How does it change?

MESSING I mean (turns to Ross), there was an episode of your show [Black-ish] that was shelved because it had to do with “Take a knee,” right?

Full Interview: The Hollywood Reporter

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Press/Video/Photos: The Hollywood Reporter Roundtable

Press/Video/Photos: The Hollywood Reporter Roundtable

Rachel is featured in The Hollywood Reporter’s Comedy Actress Roundtable. You can watch her segment below, and you can also see her in Drew Barrymore’s segment here. The full Comedy Actress Roundtable airs on Sundance TV July 1.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

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